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MN Fox News talks to MSNA about healthy eating

Last week, Mary Fish, President of the Minnesota School Nutrition Association was interviewed by FOX 9 about how to get kids to choose more healthy options at school and at home! (Click to watch video.)

LZX  -FOX clip

How to NOT Give Your Office Food Poisoning at the Holiday Party

food-safety-powerpoint-lesson-plansWe just loved this! Tips from the USDA to pass onto everyone you know. No one wants to be sick at the holidays and no one wants to the cause of someone else being sick!

Most offices host some sort of get-together this time of year and you may be asked to bring a dish. If you’re not bringing food to the office, you may be bringing something to another get-together with family or friends. Follow these tips to be sure your diners remember your nice contribution, instead of a naughty case of food poisoning.

Tip 1: Keep Hot Food Hot. Hot items are best served immediately after cooking or reheating. If you plan on serving a hot item at the office party, take it straight from the oven and either place it in an insulated bag or hot food carrier. If you can’t serve it as soon as you arrive, return it to the oven. Alternatively, you can completely chill the item and transport it according to Tip 2. Once you arrive at the office reheat it using a microwave, stove, or oven to 165 °F.

Tip 2: Keep Cold Food Cold. Cold items should remain in the refrigerator for as long as possible. When transporting cold dishes, place items in a cooler with plenty of ice or frozen gel packs. A refrigerator thermometer in the cooler is a useful way to make sure items remain at proper chill temperature of 40 °F or below.

Tip 4: Use Several Small Platters. For both hot and cold items, arrange and serve food on several small platters rather than on large platter. This way you can hold food at safe temperatures (cold foods below 40 °F and hot foods above 140 °F) until partygoers are ready to eat it.

Tip 5: Keep Track of Time. Keep track of how long items have been sitting on the buffet table and discard anything out longer than two hours. You never want to leave perishable foods, such as meat, poultry, eggs and casseroles in the “Danger Zone” over two hours. The danger zone is between 40 and 140 °F where bacteria multiply rapidly. After two hours, enough bacteria may have grown in your food to make partygoers sick. Exceptions to the danger zone include ready-to-eat items like cookies, crackers, bread and whole fruit. If you follow these tips, those enjoying your dish will not suffer a bout of food poisoning. -

See more at: http://blogs.usda.gov/2014/12/04/how-to-not-give-your-office-food-poisoning-at-the-holiday-party/#sthash.vZ2X2MrO.dpuf

 

Dining in for Healthy Families: Cookbook from Owatonna High School

How is our hometown of Owatonna celebrating Family and Consumer Sciences Day? We’re glad you asked and we’re happy to share the news from the local newspaper, the Owatonna People’s Press

“A few weeks ago, I asked them each to bring in two recipes,” said FACS teacher Connie Pittmann on Tuesday. “Some brought pasta, sides, salads. Some brought desserts. I just handed them today our class cookbook, so we typed them all together.”

The recipes were collected and then published in a cookbook with the theme “Dining in for Healthy Families.” Pittmann said the theme may change in the years following. Nonetheless, the FACS department will be participating every year around this time here on out she said.

On Dec. 3, students will take the cookbook home and make a healthy meal with their family. This day was proclaimed as Family and Consumer Sciences Day in Minnesota by Gov. Mark Dayton and the national organization has set a goal of 200,000 families across the country preparing and enjoying a healthy meal together.

We love the idea! It might be too late for other schools to create a clever cookbook – but not too late to have students find recipes to Dine In to recognize Family and Consumer Science Day on December 3!

EPES Concepcion leads workshops on nutrition, health, human rights and gender

We are very passionate about our support for EPES, so we wanted to send the update from some of their recent training. We have done our best to translate from the original Spanish.

EPES Conception teaches workshops on health and nutrition and social service approaches to human rights

foto-1Concepción, Chile, October 28, 2014 (EPES) .- Since June, EPES Conception Foundation has been doing workshops on nutrition and health for women involved in community organizations, including educators and primary care workers health in Hualpén communes, Talcahuano, Penco and Tomé.

The goal of EPES training is for participants to gain new insights into the economic, political, social and cultural aspects of health and nutrition both on the individual and community perspective. The workshops are taught by Virginia Norambuena, educator Foundation EPES Conception.

Upon completing the workshops, the trainees are expected to deploy awareness campaigns targeted at their local community and strive to have an impact on public policies especially as they related to nutrition and community emphasizing human rights and gender.

Women participants belong to community organizations, including neighborhood councils, committees Vida Chile, Cultural Centers, Health Groups, Groups Adult / Senior ace, Health Clinics, Women’s Groups, Community and Ecological Association, Local Development Councils, Health Committees, among others.

Included in the group of educators are participants working in different educational communities, so their contribution to community awareness, developing classroom and families work in health promotion and prevention from a holistic view is important.

The third and final workshop will be held in early November, it is aimed at workers already established in the primary health care field. Virginia Norambuena said that the workshops correspond to current consequences of unhealthy food, social aspects of diet, nutrition transition and the classes propose practical tools for healthy eating that supports the health of communities.

Most School-Age Children Get Too Much Sodium: Help is here

The Pew Charitable Trust reports bad news for kids and sodium in-take…

More than 90 percent of school-age children in the United States consume more sodium each day than current dietary guidelines recommend, according to new data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

CDC finds that U.S. children ages 6 to 18 consume an average of about 3,300 milligrams of sodium a day. The 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend that children’s daily intake of sodium be less than 2,300 milligrams. Consuming too much sodium increases the risk of developing high blood pressure and heart disease—costly medical conditions that can lead to heart attacks and strokes.

Schools can help students avoid excess sodium by serving meals and snacks low in salt, CDC experts conclude. Their study found that children consumed 43 percent of their sodium from just 10 common foods, including pizza, chicken nuggets, cold cuts, and other items traditionally found on school menus.

Learning ZoneXpress has a series of products that helps schools, parents and kids recognize the problem with a diet rich in sodium…

myplate-tune-out-sodium-posterMyPlate Tune Out Sodium Poster

Tune out the sodium in foods and choose the lower numbers. The MyPlate Tune Out Sodium Poster uses a music theme to promote the MyPlate message to compare sodium levels in foods and choose the ones with the lower numbers. MyPlate is the new USDA food symbol replacing the food guide pyramid.

18″ x 24″ Laminated

Also available in the MyPlate Sound Advice Poster Set

Item # 410145
UPC: 846742003080
Price: $14.95 

shake-the-salt-habit-tri-fold-brochuresShake the Salt Habit Tri-Fold Brochures

Discover ways to reduce your intake of sodium without sacrificing flavor with tips from the Shake the Salt Habit Tri-Fold Brochure. This educational nutrition brochure helps promote nutrition and health through basic information and practical advice that helps explain how to reduce your daily sodium intake and be aware of high sodium foods.

The educational salt pamphlet explains the sources of sodium in our diets, common high sodium foods, how to read food labels, and tips to reduce sodium intake.

A Healthy Habit™ are a series of tri-fold brochures that are easy-to-read nutrition education resources for the doctor’s office, healthcare clinic, classroom, or workplace. Other topics covered include MyPlate on a Budget, Handy Portions, Breakfast Basics, and more.

50 copies
8 1/2” x 11”, tri-fold

“This item is listed on the WIC Works Resource System.”

Item # 210208
UPC: 846742003684
Price: $16.95